Tax reform on the table in Paravia


Following her landmark victory over the incumbent High Chancellor in the February 19 general election, Lise Næsheim-Renwick is set to get to work on a policy platform that includes tax reform for the micronation.

At present, Paravia suffers from what its Emperor, Patrick Renwick, described to the Coprieta Standard as an “inefficient” taxation system. A monthly tax of 25 Norwegian Krones (approximately $3 USD) is levied on each citizen; however, the government’s ability to collect the tax has been wanting due to a popular reliance on credit/debit cards in Norway, where much of the population resides, and the lack of a proper tracking system for tax remittances.

One proposal to address the inefficiency under Næsheim-Renwick’s mandate is to collect the monthly tax at less-regular increments, such as bi-monthly or quarterly. Such a time frame would reduce the inconvenience associated with withdrawing such a relatively small sum of Krones from macronational financial institutions each month on the part of the citizenry while allowing the Paravian government to more easily track remittances.

In addition to her focus on tax reform, Næsheim-Renwick will seek to implement what media in Paravia describe as a “progressive platform” that includes the development of a proper national budget, the expansion of the Law Code to include more protections for common citizens, and an increased focus on diplomacy for the micronation.

Tax reform on the table in Paravia